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Ministry of Justice Reports Over 400 Percent Increase in Lost Laptops in Three Years

December 2019 by Apricorn & FoI Requests

Apricorn, the manufacturer of software-free, 256-bit AES XTS hardware-encrypted USB drives, today announced new findings from Freedom of Information (FoI) requests submitted to five government departments into the security of devices held by public sector employees. The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) lost 354 mobile phones, PCs, laptops and tablet devices in FY 2018/19 compared with 229 between 2017/2018. The number of lost laptops alone, has risen from 45 in 2016/17 to 101 in 2017/18 and up to 201 in 2018/2019, an increase of more than 400 percent in three years.

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FoI requests were submitted to the MoJ, Ministry of Education (MoE), Ministry of Defence (MoD), NHS Digital and NHS England during September-November 2019. Of the five government departments contacted, three out of five government departments responded. The MoE also reported 91 devices lost or stolen in 2019, whilst NHS Digital have lost 35 to date in 2019.

“Whilst devices are easily misplaced, it’s concerning to see such vast numbers being lost and stolen, particularly given the fact these are government departments ultimately responsible for volumes of sensitive public data. A lost device can pose a significant risk to the government if it is not properly protected” said Jon Fielding, Managing Director, EMEA, Apricorn.

When questioned about the use of USB and other storage devices in the workplace, or when working remotely, all three departments confirmed that employees use USB devices. The MoJ added that all USB ports on laptops and desktops are restricted and can only be used when individuals have requested that the ports be unlocked. Each of the responding departments noted that all USB and storage devices are encrypted.

“Modern day mobile working is designed to support the flexibility and efficiency increasingly required in 21st century roles, but this also means that sensitive data is often stored on mobile and laptop devices. If a device that is not secured is lost and ends up in the wrong hands, the repercussions can be hugely detrimental, even more so with GDPR now in full force”, noted Fielding. In a survey by Apricorn earlier this year, roughly a third (32%) of respondents said that their organisation had already experienced a data loss or breach as a direct result of mobile working and to add to this, 30 percent of respondents from organisations where the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) applies were concerned that mobile working is an area that will most likely cause them to be non-compliant.

All responding sectors did confirm that they have security policies in place that cover all mobile, storage and laptop devices.

“Knowing that these government departments have policies in place to protect sensitive data is somewhat reassuring, however, they need to be doing a lot more to avoid the risk of a data breach resulting from these lost devices. Corporately approved, hardware encrypted storage devices should be provided as standard. These should be whitelisted on the IT infrastructure, blocking access to all non-approved media. Should a device then ‘go missing’ the data cannot be accessed or used inappropriately” Fielding added.


About Apricorn
Headquartered in Poway, California, Apricorn provides secure storage innovations to the most prominent companies in the categories of finance, healthcare, education, and government throughout North America, Canada and EMEA. Apricorn products have become the trusted standard for a myriad of data security strategies worldwide. Founded in 1983, numerous award-winning products have been developed under the Apricorn brand as well as for a number of leading computer manufacturers on an OEM basis.

About the FoI Requests
The research was conducted through Freedom of Information requests submitted through Whatdotheyknow.com. The requests, submitted between September and November 2019




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