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SlashNext Debuts Industry Internet Threat Protection System

November 2017 by Marc Jacob

SlashNext announced the company’s broad market release of the SlashNext Internet Access Protection System to protect organizations from cross platform social engineering and phishing, malware, exploits and callback attacks. The system goes beyond first generation signature-based and second generation sandbox-based technologies and deploys human-like intelligence and cognitive thinking to stop these Internet attacks targeting unsuspecting employees as their entry points.

Today, automatic software updates and enhanced security offered in modern browsers prevent most software exploits such as buffer overruns and privilege escalations, but social engineering and phishing attacks exploit human vulnerabilities by deceiving victims into taking actions that will breach their company and their connected client’s networks. In fact, social engineering and phishing attacks are the fastest growing security threat for organizations today, representing 43% of all Internet access threats, nearly double that of malware and viruses, according to the Verizon Data Breach Digest.

In a recent review of more than 50 deployments, SlashNext identified dozens of instances of zero-day social engineering and phishing, exploits and malware attacks that had gone undetected by the customers’ existing firewalls, sandbox, data-exfiltration prevention tools and next gen anti-virus software.

The SlashNext solution is deployed via a simple, 20-minute installation process that requires zero policy configuration or ongoing maintenance. Once installed, the system employs a patent pending threat protection technology that includes:

* A cross platform protocol analysis engine that processes gigabits of Internet bound traffic in real-time to extract a complex set of artifacts. These artifacts are essentially the telltale signs of a malicious attack.

* The artifacts are further processed by a cognitive computing machine that uses massive cloud computing power to convert these features into clear Indicators of Compromise (IOCs).

* The IOCs are then handed over to hundreds of reasoning engines that behave like a team of decision-makers working together to reach a single verdict, "100% Malicious" or "Not Malicious."

* Once a decision is made, the final outcome is shared back with all the decision makers as part of a peer feedback mechanism that gives the system its unique self-learning capability. This process is a huge contrast to machine learning based systems that need to be manually trained repeatedly by data scientists and an exact replication of a team of human threat researchers who process raw data, compile evidence, analyze using cognition, discuss and then collectively reach a decision.

Availability: The SlashNext Internet Access Protection System is available immediately in North America via a subscription-as-a-service model that includes product support and built in threat intelligence.




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