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Kaspersky launches new solution to combat privacy and security risks from civilian drones

October 2019 by Emmanuelle Lamandé

Kaspersky has launched a new solution designed to help organisations and property owners defend themselves from unauthorised trespassing by civilian drones. Through a combination of several sensors – including a new approach to drone detection founded by the company using laser scanning – and machine learning technologies, Kaspersky Antidrone can automatically spot, identify and prohibit unmanned aircraft from entering restricted areas. This is all done without damaging the devices.

To help make the use of unmanned aircraft systems safer, reduce the associated risks and increase operator responsibility, Kaspersky has developed its own antidrone solution. Kaspersky Antidrone software coordinates the work of several hardware modules provided by partners and distinguishes drones from other objects. The primary detection module searches for drones using video cameras combined with radar, LIDAR, and audio sensors – depending on the customers’ needs and environment. Using a laser scanner to determine the position of the drone is unique to Kaspersky’s solution, and has not been applied to this field before.

When a moving object is detected in the sky, its coordinates are transmitted to a dedicated server, which then sends them on to a special unit. In accordance with data from the primary detection module, this unit rotates towards the object, tracks it and then the camera zooms in on it. At the same time, a neural network, trained to identify drones among other moving items, analyses the object on the video. If it is distinguished as a drone, the server sends the command to the dedicated module to jam the communication between the device and its controller. As a result, the drone either flies back to the place it took off from or lands in the location where it lost signal with the controller. This means that the device will not be damaged, as there is no physical contact or attack towards the drone.

The software can be delivered as a stand-alone solution within third-party hardware, as a mobile version (for example, to be used on the top of off-road cars), or integrated with other monitoring systems, including smart home infrastructure.




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